The context:
August 19, 2004: Seven-week hold on non-Kannada films
August 24, 2004: Panel for deferred release of non-Kannada films
August 29, 2004: It’s curtains for 21 City theatres
August 31, 2004: 47 more Bangalore theatres to stop screening from today

A protectionist measure?
Yes.

A simple solution?
No.

This is insane. And foolish. To say the least.

Why don’t I see anybody filing a public interest litigation as this seems to be infringing on our Right to Freedom of Speech and Expression as guaranteed by the Article 19(1), in addition to the Right to Information?

Even otherwise, does this also not fall under the purview of the Monlopolies and Restrictive Trade Practices (Prevention) Act?

I for one would like answers to the above two questions.

Legalities aside, allow me to present the following analogy:

A Tabla Concert by Ustad Zakir Hussain is on at an auditorium. I am either NOT allowed inside, or do not reach in time to get tickets for the same. Would I then walk into an adjoining / nearby auditorium to see some local play tabla?

No.

To add:

There are 100s of Kannada, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, and more movies playing in the theatres every year. Do we see them all?

No.

There are so many Hollywood and other English movies that play in the theatres every year. Do we see them all?

No.

To cut the long chase short:

We ONLY SEE those movies which seem interesting to us.

We ONLY SEE those movies that we WANT TO SEE.

If I wanted to eat a pear, and no pear was available… Would I eat an apple?

I think NOT.

But then there are people who would settle for the apple… And then there are people who will go to the next shop.

Wake up! O producers, directors, and actors, and members of the Kannada Film Industry. Before YOU KILL the movie going habits of the people…

Wake up BEFORE YOU KILL a medium. The medium called cinema.

Nakul